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Wednesday, June 16, 2010

The Ocean Edge Resort Takes Advantage of its Waterfront Setting

With six pools, a Jack Nicklaus-designed golf course, tennis courts, and bike paths that connect easily to the 22-mile long Cape Cod Rail Trail, the Ocean Edge Resort offers its guests more than enough outdoor activity. Yet, I’m most excited about the resort’s latest partnership with Cape Cod Museum of Natural History to go on naturalist-led walks on the mud flats of Bay Pines Beach. Throughout the summer, you’ll explore Cape Cod Bay at low tide, searching for clams, crabs, sea cucumbers, and other marine life. The beachcombing is appropriate for ages 5 and up and they don’t need to dress up like SpongeBob. Though it might help find other critters.
 


Posted by Steve Jermanok on 06/16/10 at 01:00 PM
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Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Win a Vacation for the Next 50 Years

Travelers with a good sense of humor should submit a photo of themselves to a new contest hosted by Hotels.com. If you can somehow get others to vote for you "desperately needing a summer vacation," earning top vote getter, you’ll win an all-expenses paid, five-night getaway with roundtrip airfare and $1000 cash FOR THE NEXT 50 YEARS! Hotels.com is also giving away FLIP camcorders daily.
 


Posted by Steve Jermanok on 06/15/10 at 12:59 PM
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Monday, June 14, 2010

So You Want to Own a B&B, Part Two

In 2004, I wrote a cover story for the Boston Globe Sunday Magazine called, “So You Want to Own a B&B.” In the article, I spoke about the dream of leaving your current job and opening a country inn. The new innkeepers underestimated the amount of hours it took to run a B&B and many burned out quickly. During my research, I met a couple, Jennifer and Ed Dorta-Duque, who were taking a course on the ups and downs of running an inn. At the time, they had quit their jobs as software developers in Baltimore and had been searching for an inn for over 1 ½ years, looking at more than 50 properties in Annapolis, Pennsylvania, Cape Cod, Nantucket, and New York’s Finger Lakes region.  Finally, they came upon the Three Mountain Inn in Jamaica, Vermont, and made the purchase. Six years later, the couple is still going strong and the inn, located in a quiet village on the backside of Stratton Mountain, is a wonderful weekend retreat any time of year.
 


Posted by Steve Jermanok on 06/14/10 at 01:00 PM
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Friday, June 11, 2010

Sea Kayak God’s Pocket Marine Provincial Park, British Colombia

Those of you who’ve had the good fortune to sea kayak the Gulf Islands accompanied by seals, sea lions, and the occasional whale know the sheer exuberance of paddling in British Colombia. But the word has certainly spread, with more and more sea kayaking and whale watching outfitters joining the fray and dotting the waters of Johnstone Strait. That’s why Sea Kayak Adventures has decided to venture farther north this August to paddle in Canada’s newest marine park, . Starting in the North Vancouver Island town of Port Hardy, the six-day jaunt takes you through the remote waters of Queen Charlotte Strait to spot humpback, minke, and orca whales, porpoises, seals, and sea otters. You’ll camp on the quiet island shores, hike into the lush rain forest, and explore tidal pools for colorful sea stars. Cost is $1595 per person Canadian and includes guides, all meals, camping, and kayaking gear. Dates are August 9-14 and August 16-21.
 


Posted by Steve Jermanok on 06/11/10 at 01:00 PM
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Thursday, June 10, 2010

Mass Audubon Cruises to the Elizabeth Islands

Take the ferry from New Bedford or Woods Hole to Martha’s Vineyard, where President Obama plans to vacation once again this summer, and you’ll pass the far less congested Elizabeth Islands in Buzzards Bay. With numerous coves and a strong southwesterly wind blowing 15 knots almost every afternoon, this is a favorite cruising ground for sailors in Massachusetts. The waters are inundated with yachts, Hobie cats, sunfish, schooners, even the 6’ 2” long dinghy known as the Cape Cod Frosty. Only two of the islands, Cuttyhunk, the outermost island, and Penikese, a former leper colony, now a state-owned bird refuge, remain public. This summer, Mass Audubon will bring guests on naturalist-led cruises to both islands. Leaving from Wood’s Hole, you’ll learn about the natural and cultural history of the Elizabeths, and venture on foot to find Leach’s Storm Petrel and Tern colonies.


 


Posted by Steve Jermanok on 06/10/10 at 01:00 PM
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Wednesday, June 09, 2010

Raft the Pacuare River with Explorer Richard Bangs

In 1973, Richard Bangs co-founded Sobek Expeditions and almost single handedly put the sport of white water rafting on the map. Sobek was the first outfitter to descend Chile’s Bio Bio River and Zimbabwe’s Zambezi River, now considered classics. In 1991, Sobek merged with Mountain Travel to form one of the premier adventure companies in the world. Now Bangs has joined forces with another renowned rafting outfitter, OARS, to guide a trip down Costa Rica’s Pacuare River. From July 10-16, join Richard and his son Walker as they raft the Pacuare, then head to Tortuguero National Park on the Caribbean coast. With its maze of waterways, Tortuguero is often called the Venice of Costa Rica. From mid-spring to late summer, four different types of turtle return to shores to lay their eggs, including the giant leatherback, which can weigh over 1,000 pounds. Cost is $1780 per person and you can book at 800-346-6277.


Posted by Steve Jermanok on 06/09/10 at 01:00 PM
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Tuesday, June 08, 2010

Poaching of Rhinos on the Rise in South Africa

As the world descends on South Africa for the World Cup this week and the safari season starts to get into full swing, we report some sad news from the country. David Mabunda, chief executive officer for South African National Parks, notes that rhinos are currently under siege from poachers. South Africa lost 122 rhinos to poaching in 2009 and is already on track to surpass that number this year. The horns are highly sought after in Asia for medicinal purposes and are thus worth far more than their weight in gold. So far, 25 poachers have been caught, primarily in Kruger. Responding to the increase in poaching, South Africa has set up a Wildlife Crime Reaction Unit, utilizing many of the country’s top anti-poaching experts.
 


Posted by Steve Jermanok on 06/08/10 at 01:00 PM
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Monday, June 07, 2010

Maine Huts & Trails Begins Construction on Third Hut

Maine Huts & Trails, the nonprofit organization hoping to build 12 backcountry huts over 180 miles of trails in the remote western mountains of the state, has just announced the creation of their third lodging. Slated to be completed by the end of 2010, the hut will be built on the banks of the Dead River, two miles below the cascading waters of Grand Falls. Each of the three huts, including the Poplar Stream Falls and the Flagstaff Lake hut, are spaced about 11 miles apart, so people can reach it within one day of hiking. For less than $100 per person per adult and under $50 per children, each hiker gets a night’s sleep on a bed, hot showers, dinner, and breakfast. Not a bad way to be lost in this vast tract of wilderness, treasured for its mountains, large lakes, sinuous rivers, and waterfalls.
 


Posted by Steve Jermanok on 06/07/10 at 01:00 PM
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Friday, June 04, 2010

Paved a Lot, Put up Paradise

Last summer, I wrote a story for Outside Magazine on the transformation of abandoned oil plants, railroad yards, even elevated railroad lines (the High Line Park in Manhattan) into popular urban parks. Now The Trust for Public Land’s Peter Harnik has written a book on the subject called “Urban Green: Innovative Parks for Resurgent Cities.” A must read for any urban visionary, the book not only delves into examples, but is a primer on how to create parks from space that not long ago was thought of as unusable. Grab lunch at Chelsea Market and have a picnic on the High Line, like I recently did, and you realize the brilliance of this concept.

 


Posted by Steve Jermanok on 06/04/10 at 01:00 PM
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Thursday, June 03, 2010

Idaho’s First Whitewater Park Opens This Month

For those of you headed to Idaho this summer to brave the rip-roaring rapids of the Middle Fork of the Salmon River or Hell’s Canyon on Snake River, you might want to get a little warm-up at the new Kelly’s Whitewater Park. Located an hour and half drive north of Boise on State Highway 55, the park is open to all kayakers, canoeists, rafters, and tubers, regardless of experience. Beginner and advanced areas of the park are divided by a man-made island, so simply choose your level of wave action and go play. The park is open to the public for free and a kayak school will help novices master the tough rapids to get them over to the expert section. The park is located in Cascade on the North Fork of the Payette River. 
 


Posted by Steve Jermanok on 06/03/10 at 01:00 PM
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Longtime Boston Globe travel writer, Steve Jermanok, dishes out his favorite travel locales and provides topical travel information that comes across his desk.

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